Climate Change and Displacement Programme

The International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD) is one of the leading research, and capacity building organizations working on climate change and development in Bangladesh. The goal of ICCCAD is to develop a world- class institution that is closely related to evidence-based research, local experience, knowledge dissemination, and advocacy for the vulnerable communities in Bangladesh; one of the most affected by climate change. ICCCAD visions to be a research-based global Centre of Excellence on Climate Change and Development in Bangladesh. ICCCAD has also built and led a network of Southern-based partner institutes, together with educating the world about Climate Change and Development and increasing capacity in the Global South.

Importance of Displacement

Among the many adverse impacts of Climate Change in vulnerable countries, climate change induced displacement caused by extreme weather events is a big concern. In densely populated countries such as Bangladesh, climate induced displacement causes citizens to migrate to already densely populated cities. Rapid urbanization and poorly managed settlements in these cities lead to further environmental degradation by putting pressure on scarce water, energy and food sources and causing uncontrolled waste disposal. The issue of forced displacement due to climate change impacts is one that can be turned from a challenge into an opportunity if the right kinds of anticipatory actions are taken to minimize the adverse impacts and enhance the positive opportunities for potential future climate migrants. The Warsaw International Mechanism (WIM) has set up a task force on displacement due to climate change, which has produced its reports with recommendations for actions to “avert, minimise and address” loss and damage. There are several other international fora and discourses where this issue is relevant, such as the Platform on Disaster Displacement (PDD) and the Migrants in Countries in Crisis (MICIC), in which Bangladesh is already playing a leadership role.

Displacement in the Context of Bangladesh

In densely populated countries such as Bangladesh, climate-induced displacement causes citizens to migrate to already densely populated cities. Rapid urbanization and poorly managed settlements in these cities lead to further environmental degradation by putting pressure on scarce water, energy, and food sources and causing uncontrolled waste disposal. The issue of forced displacement due to climate change impacts is one that can be turned from a challenge into an opportunity if the right kinds of anticipatory actions are taken to minimize the adverse impacts and enhance the positive opportunities for potential future climate migrants.

Irrespective of the displacement scenario, planned relocation or managed retreat is non-viable in Bangladesh because of land scarcity. Therefore, two options are left concerning the settlement of displaced people at the place of destinations, which are autonomous relocation of displaced individuals (without much government support) and government-supported temporary settlement (Khan et al. 2021)[1]. On the flip side of the coin, a considerable number of people are trapped within the climate hotspots experiencing poverty, resource degradation, fragile livelihoods, food insecurity, health deterioration, and increased inequality. To unburden the metropolises, secondary cities need to be prepared so that they might become hospitable homes for climate refugees, offering a healthy living environment.

Climate Change and Displacement Programme

ICCCAD is strongly committed to develop locally appropriate and innovative solutions that benefits poor, marginalized, displaced and vulnerable communities affected by climate change. The current partnerships with BRAC, SPARC, GCRF and UKRI help to assess current scenarios of poverty-stricken people along with displaced communities in Bangladesh. The projects under this programme seek to explore the field of climate-induced hazards, livelihood challenges and displacement in Bangladesh.

[tabs type=”horizontal”]
[tabs_head]
[tab_title] Objective 1[/tab_title]
[tab_title] Objective 2 [/tab_title]
[tab_title] Objective 3 [/tab_title]
[/tabs_head]
[tab]Research to generate the evidences and explore the root causes as well as scrutinize the pattern and dynamic of displacement (voluntary/ involuntary/ trapped/ cross-border) [/tab]
[tab]Fostering ground findings of climate- induced displacement and advocacy to incorporate into national and international migration policies.[/tab]
[tab]Identify the human mobility decision making factors and linkage between Loss and Damage and climate-induced displacement.[/tab]
[/tabs]

Events

  1. South Asia Regional Resilience Hub – COP27, Focal, Voices from Climate Migrants of South Asia, online, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amzNY8WQbAM&t=1603

Event Report

  1. IUI Community Profile – Dhaka informal settlements
  2. Project Completion Report on Inclusive Urban Infrastructure for Marginal Communities
  3. Stakeholder Workshop Report in Dhaka

Activities

  1. Migrants on the margins
    Funders: ESRC and GCRF
    Objectives: Comparative approach to look at the opportunities available to migrants in order to better understandings their experiences and vulnerabilities
    Duration: 2016-2018
  2. Climate Induced Migration IBP
    Project Title: Supporting host city local government plans for growth and increased migration, including plans for housing, education and health facilities
    Funding Support by PROKAS-British Council
    Project duration of the study: May 2019 to September 2019.
  3. Inclusive urban Infrastructure
    Objectives: Inclusive urban infrastructure for marginal communities
    Funder: GCRF and ESRC
    Duration: 2020-2023
  4. Climate Resilient Migrant Friendly Town (CRMFT)
    Funder: GCA and UKAID
    Objectives: Ensuring local governments and urban residents are in the driving seat for the design, planning, implementation, and monitoring of adaptation and climate resilience efforts, including in the initial mapping of local climate change risks and vulnerabilities
    Duration: 2023-ongoing

Publications

  1. Climate-induced Displacement: Loss and Damage in Bangladesh. Urbanet, 2023. https://www.urbanet.info/loss-and-damage-bangladesh/
  2. A Small Town Copes With Big Disaster: What Can We Learn from Mongla in Bangladesh? Urbanet, 2023, https://www.urbanet.info/climate-adaption-mongla- bangladesh/
  3. Shilpi’s story; water water everywhere, Dhaka Tribune, 2023, http://website.icccad.net/dhaka-tribune-articles/climate-tribune/february- 2023/
  4. Success story from the informal settlements of Bangladesh, Dhaka Tribune, 2022, https://www.dhakatribune.com/tribune- climate/2022/05/18/success-story-from-the-informal-settlements-of-bangladesh
  5. Water Security in Secondary Cities of Bangladesh: A Case of Mongla. Development Letters, 2022. https://www.rapidbd.org/wp- content/uploads/2022/11/Bangladesh_Development-Letters-July_August- 2022_EN.pdf
  6. Comic Dissemination Revolutionizes Learning for Students and Communities, International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD), 2023, http://website.icccad.net/blog/comic-dissemination-revolutionizes- learning-for-students-and-communities/
  7. Improving water access for the poorest households in Mongla. Inclusive Urban Infrastructure (IUI), 2023, https://www.inclusiveinfrastructure.org/improving-water-access-for-the- poorest-households-in-mongla/
  8. Exploring Colombo: A Journey of Urban Inclusion and Academic Collaboration, International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD), 2023, http://website.icccad.net/blog/exploring- colombo-a-journey-of-urban-inclusion-and-academic-collaboration/
  9. Study visit to Hopley Farm in Zimbabwe, Inclusive Urban Infrastructure (IUI), 2023, https://www.inclusiveinfrastructure.org/study-visit-to-hopley-farm-in-zimbabwe/
  10. Access to water services in informal settlements in Mongla, Bangladesh, Inclusive Urban Infrastructure, 2022, https://www.inclusiveinfrastructure.org/access-to-water-services-in-informal- settlements-in-mongla-bangladesh/
  11. Visiting Researcher, International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD), 2022, http://website.icccad.net/blog/centring-human-rights-choice-and-agency-in-forced- climate-displacement-policy-design-bd/
  12. Silpi’s Story Water Water Everywhere, Dhaka Comics, 2023, https://www.dhakacomics.com/webcomics/silpys-story/silpis- story-water-water-everywhere

ICCCAD’s Displacement Programme Team

[one_third]Juel Mahmud
Programme Coordinator[/one_third][one_third]Md.Lutfor Rahman
Research Officer[/one_third][one_third_last]Farhin Rahman Reeda
Research Officer[/one_third_last]